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Using Teas for Cannabis


At Cannabus DC, we strive to use sustainable biological growing practices that focuses on soil health. We allow the soil, and the biology it contains, to give the plant exactly what it needs. One way that we feed the soil is through the use of different types of horticultural teas.

Botanical Teas - There are two main types of botanical teas which include fermented and fresh. This information focuses on use fresh teas using dried plant matter (meal).  The process of making a fresh tea is very easy process and can be done quite easily. The process requires a 5 gallon bucket and fresh clean water (chlorine and chloramine free), you can bubble it with an airstone (available at any hydro store) but stirring it every few hours can produce great results as well. Let the solution sit for 24 hours and then feed to your plants. Full strength for established plants or ½ strength for seedlings.

Seed Sprout Tea - This is the process of sprouting various types of seeds for 24 hours and then keeping them moist until they sprout 1-2 inches. The next step is to add them to a blender with a little water and pulverize the seeds. Mix the solution with 5 gallons of water and bubble for and hour. Strain the mixture and water into your plants. The most amazing thing about SST is the value. You are able to feed your soil for pennies. One of our favorite seeds to use is organic popcorn seeds.

Compost Tea - I would like to preface this with the disclosure that not all compost is created equally and because of that, the quality of compost tea varies greatly. At Cannabus DC we make our own thermal compost and worm castings in house as well as source compost and worm castings from artisan companies. We use compost teas as a way to add additional varieties of soil life to increase the nutrients cycling of the soil food web. Currently we are brewing Boogie Brew’s open source compost tea recipe with the addition of Boogie Frass and Boogie Brix. The compost tea is then inspected under a microscope to ensure the diversity of the tea.

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